Reports

2016 Report
  '11‐'12 '12‐'13 '13‐'14 '14 - '15 ’15 - ‘16
CATEGORY 28 incidents 44 incidents 38 incidents 39 incidents 31 incidents
Race 14 16 14 18 18
Ethnicity 0 7 3 0 2
Race & Sexual Orientation 2 1 1 0 0
Harassment 0 2 2 0 0
Race & Religion 0 0 1 0 0
Sexual Orientation 9 13 7 5 2
Sexual Harassment 2 1 5 11 2
Gender Identity 0 0 0 0 1
Religion 1 2 2 3 3
Religion & Sexual Harassment 0 0 1 0 0
Disability 0 2 2 0 2
Not Alleging Bias       1 0
Other/Multiple       1 1
OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF REPORTED INCIDENTS:          
Graffiti 11 18 17 8 6
In Person 17 26 18 28 24
Social/Print Media 0 0 3 3 1
OF THE REPORTED IN-PERSON AND SOCIAL MEDIA INCIDENTS:          
Student to Student * 14 16 8 18 19
Faculty to Student 1 6 5 6 5
Staff to Student 1 2 4 5 6
Student to Staff 1 0 2 0 0
Off Campus to Student 0 3 1 10 1
Staff to Staff 0 0 1 0 0

*For purposes of counting these incidents, residence hall graffiti was identified as occurring between students.

Year End Analysis: The number of reports receive d this year by BART (31) was the fewest received since ’11-’12 (28 reports).  It continues a general downward trend since the peak in ’12-13’ (44re ports).  Continuing the pattern of previous years, the fall semester was busier with 20 reports and then followed by a  drop off to 11 reports in the spring. 

Race and  Sexual Orientation: In this and all previous years, a plurality or outright majority of the reports were related to race and/or ethnicity alone or in conjunction with other characteristics. This year the number of race/ethnicity based incidents stayed the same but they rose as a percentage (64.5%). Reports of sexual orientation related bias have dropped drastically during the past three years from a high of 13 incidents in ’12-’13 (29.5%) to a low this year of 2 incidents (6.5%). The strong implication is that there has been a positive cultural shift in the area of sexual orientation inclusivity at the College.

Sexual Harassment: BART reports of sexual harassment decreased significantly this year. For ’13-’14, 21% of reports were regarding sexual harassment, rising to 28% for ’14-‘15. Last year’s BART report suggested that the increase may in part have been the result of heightened awareness and activism around issues of sexual misconduct in 2014-2015, including efforts by the College and SUNY. It was BART’s hope that increased awareness would soon lead to a decrease in incidents. This year only 6.5% of BART reports related to sexual harassment. This category will need to be monitored closely this year to determine if the downward trend is real.

Graffiti vs. In-Person: BART determines the number of reports of bias acts that occur in person, as graffiti, or online/social media. From ’11-’12 until ’13-’14, there was a nearly even split between graffiti and in-person incidents or a  small majority (under 60%) were in person incidents. The College, with the assistance of BART, instituted the Think Before You Ink campaign to discourage graffiti. Graffiti reports have dropped significantly in the past two years. Last year they constituted 20.5% of reports and this year they were down to 19.4%.  The vast majority of incidents now occur as in-person interactions.

Who: As  in previous years, the majority of reported bias incidents involved interactions between students. Last year’s large increase in reports involving off-campus individuals against students (26%) was striking and appears to have been an outlier. After last year’s reports, the President’s Office made contact with local drinking establishments in regard to harassing conduct. This year, only one off-campus incident of harassment was reported. Over the past two years, there has been a  small increase in the rate of reports of biased conduct by faculty and staff against students (28% for ’14-’15 and 35% for ’15-‘16). It is recommended that BART engage in additional outreach to faculty and staff regarding bias-related issues in the coming year.

Moving Forward: Looking at five years of data, the overall number of reports has followed a  clear trend. As members of the  College community gained awareness of BART and more comfort with reporting, reports increased, initially, before dropping, perhaps as conduct improved. BART’s online (and sometimes anonymous) complaint form has added another reporting mechanism. It’s likely this has led to fewer bias incidents going unreported, allowing BART to move forward with its mission of addressing and ultimately reducing these incidents. Residence hall and anti-graffiti campaigns by BART appear to have had a positive effect and it’s recommended that BART develop additional campaigns to address patterns of bias.

Some BART strengths:
•Victims are well supported throughout the process.
•Team acted quickly on all complaints.
•BART followed up with victims after the case is closed to be sure resolution is satisfactory.
•Data has been used to track patterns and prevent recurrence.

Some BART opportunities  to improve:
•Add diversity to the team in terms of identities and departments.
•Provide education for members to help in understanding of bias and appropriate actions for supporting students.
•Develop proactive programming/education around bias, for students and employees.  
•Create effective marketing campaign.

2015-2016 BART Membership: Frank Chambers, Mary Bonderoff, Andrew Stammel, Dan Chambers, Miki Luettger, Amanda Finch, Eddy Alvarez, Ursula Sanborn-Overby and Julia Blau.

2015 Report
  '11‐'12 '12‐'13 '13‐'14 '14 - '15
CATEGORY 28 incidents 44 incidents 38 incidents 39 incidents
Race 14 16 14 18
Ethnicity 0 7 3 0
Race & Sexual Orientation 2 1 1 0
Harassment 0 2 2 0
Race & Religion 0 0 1 0
Sexual Orientation 9 13 7 5
Sexual Harassment 2 1 5 11
Gender Identity 0 0 0 0
Religion 1 2 2 3
Religion & Sexual Harassment 0 0 1 0
Disability 0 2 2 0
Not Alleging Bias       1
Other/Multiple       1
OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF REPORTED INCIDENTS:        
Graffiti 11 18 17 8
In Person 17 26 18 28
Social/Print Media 0 0 3 3
OF THE REPORTED IN-PERSON AND SOCIAL MEDIA INCIDENTS:        
Student to Student * 14 16 8 18
Faculty to Student 1 6 5 6
Staff to Student 1 2 4 5
Student to Staff 1 0 2 0
Off Campus to Student 0 3 1 10
Staff to Staff 0 0 1 0

Analysis:

The number of reports received this year by BART (39) was in line with previous years, nearly matching last year’s 38 and falling between ’11-’12 (28 reports) and ’12-13’ (44 reports). The fall semester had 30 reports with a drop off to 9 reports in the spring. In all previous years a majority of the reports were related to race and/or ethnicity alone or in conjunction with other characteristics. This year the proportion of race and ethnicity-based reports dropped to 46% of reports. Reports of sexual orientation related bias have dropped for the past two years. Reports of sexual harassment have shown an increase over the years. For ’11-’12 and ’11-’13, sexual harassment constituted about 7% of reports while they amount to 21% of last year’s reports and 28% for ’14-‘15. This increase may in part be the result of heightened awareness and activism around issues of sexual misconduct, including efforts at the College and SUNY.

The College records the number of reports of bias acts that occur in person, as graffiti, and online/social media.  In previous years there was a nearly even split between graffiti and in-person incidents or a small majority (under 60%) were in person incidents. This year shows an increase in the number of in-person events, with 72% of reports involving interactions of that nature.  Graffiti incidents again largely occurred in the residence halls.  But this year’s graffiti also included the off-campus vandalism of a student’s vehicle.

As in previous years, the majority of reported bias incidents involve interactions between students. For purposes of counting these incidents, residence hall graffiti was identified as occurring between students. The large increase in reports involving off campus individuals against students is particularly striking.  In previous years these incidents accounted for between 0% and 7% of received reports. This year’s reports involving conduct between an off-campus individual and a student amounted to 26% of the total. For counting purposes, when an incident occurred against a student off-campus and the student was not able to identify the perpetrator as a student, the perpetrator was identified as an “off-campus person.” This includes the three incidents of anonymous social media speech. There has been a slight uptick in the number of reports against employees (28%).

Looking at four years of data, the overall number of reports followed an expected trend. As members of the College community gained awareness of BART and more comfort with reporting, reports increased, initially, before dropping and plateauing. Ease of reporting has increased this year after BART posted an online (and sometimes anonymous) complaint form. Six reports were filed online with four of them being filed anonymously. It’s likely this will lead to fewer bias incidents going unreported, allowing BART to move forward with its mission of addressing and ultimately reducing these incidents. Residence hall and anti-graffiti campaigns by BART appear to have had a positive effect and it’s recommended that BART develop additional campaigns to address patterns of bias.

Some strengths:
•Victims well supported throughout process.
•Team acting quickly on all complaints.
•Continuous follow up with victims even after case is closed to be sure satisfied with action.

Some challenges:
•Perpetrator not following through on requests presented from team.  For example, person accused oversees program
with many employees and was asked to hold a workshop for all employees to address issues around bias.  Person has failed to
make these arrangements or even respond to repeated requests.
•Students’ uncomfortable bringing complaints forward involving teaching faculty members in fear of impact on grade.

This report has been prepared at the request of CDO Terrence Mitchell and is submitted on May 21, 2015, by BART co-chairs
Mary Bonderoff and Andrew Stammel.

2014-2015 BART Membership: Mary Bonderoff, Andrew Stammel, Jeanne Miller, Dan Chambers, Miki Luettger, Amanda Finch, Charlene Christie, Donald Hill, and Ursula Sanborn-Overby

2014 Report
  '11‐'12 '12‐'13 '13‐'14
CATEGORY 28 incidents 44 incidents 38 incidents
Race 14 16 14
Ethnicity 0 7 3
Race & Sexual Orientation 2 1 1
Harassment 0 2 2
Race & Religion 0 0 1
Sexual Orientation 9 13 7
Sexual Harassment 2 1 5
Gender Identity 0 0 0
Religion 1 2 2
Religion & Sexual Harassment 0 0 1
Disability 0 2 2
OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF REPORTED INCIDENTS:      
Graffiti 11 18 17
In Person 17 26 18
Social/Print Media 0 0 3
OF THE REPORTED IN-PERSON AND SOCIAL MEDIA INCIDENTS:      
Student to Student * 14 16 8
Faculty to Student 1 6 5
Staff to Student 1 2 4
Student to Staff 1 0 2
Off Campus to Student 0 3 1
Staff to Staff 0 0 1

There were fewer reported cases this year than last year but more than in the bias team's first year. As in previous years, the majority of cases (55%) in '13-­‐'14 were related to race and/or ethnicity, alone or in conjunction with other categories. The next largest categories (each at 21%) were sexual harassment and sexual orientation. Although these are not hate crimes, this trend is consistent with the FBI's national data for hate crimes.

There was an even split this year between in-­‐person and graffiti incidents that were reported. The percentage of graffiti incidents, usually in residence halls, increased slightly over past years. As was the case last year, Residence Life staff have responded quickly to graffiti incidents, which helps by reducing the number of students who are affected by these incidents. Social media was added as a category because it doesn't fit entirely in the other two categories. A perpetrator can be identified, unlike most graffiti incidents, but social media messages are not so direct as an in-­‐person incident.

In the in-­‐person and social media category, the number of student to student, off-­‐campus person to student, and faculty to student incidents dropped while the other categories increased. Student to student incidents was the largest at 38%. Almost 25% of the reported incidents were faculty to student; staff to students incidents, which were complaints against UPD officers, were about 20% of reported incidents in this category.

As in previous years, many of those who felt targeted by others did not want their names used in complaints nor did they want anything other than education for those who targeted them. This was especially true in student complaints about faculty and in graffiti incidents in residence halls. For graffiti in the residence halls, the staff worked directly with the targeted students to develop active and passive programming to emphasize individual responsibility and the importance of community. In a small number of cases, the targeted students spoke about their experiences in hall meetings.

In the majority of the incidents in which homophobic slurs are used, it is not because anyone involved is thought to be gay but because it is common among some students to use a homophobic slur when angry. In the words of one student perpetrator, "That's just a word I use when I'm angry at someone." Similarly, in many cases of graffiti on residence hall doors, the students who appear to have been targeted regard the racist or homophobic graffiti to be a prank by friends. Unfortunately, the other students in that community who see the graffiti may feel threatened by it.

The student perpetrators of in-­‐person incidents were adjudicated in the campus judicial system, as were a few students who were identified as the perpetrators of graffiti incidents. For faculty and staff offenders, those who were targeted wanted education for them. These were in the form of conversations which were conducted by one or two members of the bias team or department meetings. There were also complaints made by students about patterns of behavior as well as specific incidents involving UPD officers. All of those complaints were investigated by UPD.

Members of the '13-­‐'14 Bias Acts Response Team (BART):
Mary Bonderoff, Center for Multicultural Experiences
Michael Brown, Women and Gender Studies
Dan Chambers, UPD
Charlene Christie, Psychology Faculty
Rob Compton, ALS Faculty
Amanda Finch, Office of Judicial Affairs
Miki Luettger,Residential & Community Life
Jeanne Miller, Student Development (chair)
Elliot Ruggles, Gender and Sexuality Resource Center
Andrew Stammel, Affirmative Action Officer
Bernadette Tiapo, Office of Multicultural Student Affairs

2013 Report
  '11‐'12 '12‐'13
CATEGORY 28 incidents 44 incidents
Race 14 16
Ethnicity 0 7
Race & Sexual Orientation 2 1
Harassment 0 2
Race & Religion 0 0
Sexual Orientation 9 13
Sexual Harassment 2 1
Gender Identity 0 0
Religion 1 2
Religion & Sexual Harassment 0 0
Disability 0 2
OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF REPORTED INCIDENTS:    
Graffiti 11 18
In Person 17 26
Social/Print Media 0 0
OF THE REPORTED IN-PERSON AND SOCIAL MEDIA INCIDENTS:    
Student to Student * 14 16
Faculty to Student 1 6
Staff to Student 1 2
Student to Staff 1 0
Off Campus to Student 0 3
Staff to Staff 0 0

*some of the incidents did not take place in the year that they were reported

The committee met 10 times on a regularly-scheduled basis during the ’12-’13 academic year. The increase in the number of incidents compared to ’11-’12 is likely the result of more publicity and programming about the reporting process and the increased diversity training of residence hall staff in ’12-‘13.  As a result of the training of the resident advisors regarding the importance of responding quickly to graffiti, reports of graffiti were made by RAs before classes started in August, 2013; this is in contrast to the ’11-’12 academic year when the first report was made in October.   In addition, in ’12-’13 we had no reports of graffiti that was in place for more than a few hours; in ’11-’12, we had several instances of graffiti that was in place for days or weeks. Responses to the bias incidents included contacts by team members made to the targeted students, active and passive programming in residence halls, apologies made by the perpetrators of the bias acts, and follow up with community members (made by Colleen Brannan, Community Relations).

Members of the ’12-’13 Bias Acts Response Team
Mary Bonderoff Center for Multicultural Experiences
Charlene Christie Psychology (appointed by dean)
Dan Chambers UPD
Amanda Finch Student Judicial Affairs
Miki Luettger Residential Community Life
Jeanne Miller, chair Student Development
Kathleen O’Mara Africana/Latino Studies
Elizabeth Seale Women and Gender Studies
Andrew Stammel Affirmative Action Officer
Bernadette Tiapo Office of Multicultural Student Affairs

2012 Report
  '11‐'12
CATEGORY 28 incidents
Race 14
Ethnicity 0
Race & Sexual Orientation 2
Harassment 0
Race & Religion 0
Sexual Orientation 9
Sexual Harassment 2
Gender Identity 0
Religion 1
Religion & Sexual Harassment 0
Disability 0
OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF REPORTED INCIDENTS:  
Graffiti 11
In Person 17
Social/Print Media 0
OF THE REPORTED IN-PERSON AND SOCIAL MEDIA INCIDENTS:  
Student to Student * 14
Faculty to Student 1
Staff to Student 1
Student to Staff 1
Off Campus to Student 0
Staff to Staff

0

The Bias Acts Response Team (BART) met eleven times during the 2011-2012 academic year; meetings were called on an as-needed basis when reports were received. The team reviewed reports of 31 acts/incidents, of which three were considered not to be bias incidents.  The team was able to identify 39 students or employees who felt targeted in the incidents; all were contacted at least once by a member of the BART, informed about their options regarding action/adjudication, and asked to give suggestions for resolution.   

Of the 28 bias incidents, 14 were based on race or ethnicity, nine were based on sexual orientation, two were based on both race and sexual orientation, two were sexist, and one was based on religion.

Of the 28 bias incidents, there were 11 incidents of graffiti on public bulletin boards, white erase boards, or public signs.  It’s not possible to know exactly how many students or employees saw and were affected by the graffiti.  Although UPD investigated the graffiti incidents, no perpetrators could be identified.

The Office of Residential and Community Life responded to all reports of biased graffiti in residence halls with bulletin board campaigns, programming, and written notices to the entire residential community.  In the case of graffiti in a classroom, all of the faculty who taught in the room were informed that the graffiti was removed and an anti-bias flyer was posted for one week.  One of the affected faculty consulted with UPD re:workplace violence.  Two of the faculty requested presentations to their classes by members of the BART.  

Apart from the graffiti, there were 17 incidents of harassment. Of those incidents, 14 were student to student, one was faculty to student, one was staff to student, and one was student to staff. Most of those who felt targeted by graffiti preferred to remain anonymous and preferred indirect responses to the event.   The most frequent request from those who felt targeted by some form of harassment was for facilitated conversations with the perpetrators of the harassment.  Cases were also adjudicated through the Judicial Office.

The members of the team for ’11-‘12:  
Charlene Christie Psychology (appointed by dean)
Lorraine Hall Human Resources (Affirmative Action Advisory Committee)
Bart Ingersoll UPD
Amanda Kiakis Student Judicial Affairs
Miki Luettger Residential Community Life
Jeanne Miller, chair Student Development
Robin Nussbaum GSRC and LEAD@Oneonta
Kathleen O’Mara Africana/Latino Studies
Elizabeth Seale Women and Gender Studies
Bernadette Tiapo Office of Multicultural Student Affairs

The members of the team for ’12-‘13:  
Charlene Christie Psychology (appointed by dean) (Affirmative Action Advisory Committee)
Dan Chambers UPD
Amanda Kiakis Student Judicial Affairs
Miki Luettger Residential Community Life
Jeanne Miller, chair Student Development GSRC
Kathleen O’Mara Africana/Latino Studies
Elizabeth Seale Women and Gender Studies
Bernadette Tiapo Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (Faculty to be appointed by dean)

On the Bias Acts and Hate Crimes page are the policy and procedures for reporting bias acts and hate crimes as well as resources and information about the Bias Acts Response Team. 

University Police Department
Alumni Hall
436-3550

Office of Community Standards
Netzer 119
436-3353

Affirmative Action Office
Netzer 133B
436-2835

Office of Equity and Inclusion
Netzer 133
436-2830