Faculty

English Department faculty
Front row from left to right: Akira Yatshuashi, Daniel Payne, Amie Doughty (Chair), Kathryn Finin, Konstantina Karageorgos. Back row from left to right: Suzanne Black, Roger Hecht, Gwen Crane, George Hovis, Jonathan Sadow

Dr. Robert Bensen, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 314
607-436-2493
Robert.Bensen@oneonta.edu

Office Hours :

Courses:
No courses 

Dr. Suzanne Black
Associate Professor
Netzer 321
607-436-3033
Suzanne.Black@oneonta.edu

Suzanne Black

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
W 10-11am & 1-3pm

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 239 - Technical & Professional Writing
ELIT 274 - Modern British Poets
LING 215 - Introduction to Editing & Publishing

Suzanne Black, Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2000, came to Oneonta in Fall 2008 after several years teaching in Indiana and Minnesota. She teaches courses in modern world literature, professional writing, and composition. In addition to her literature background (a PhD in comparative literature from the University of Michigan), she has an undergraduate degree in chemistry and experience as a grant writer.

She remains interested in popular science writing and in more humanistic aspects of the sciences, such as scientific images and overlaps between literature and the sciences. Her current research focuses on visuals in molecular biology and on the influence of scientific inquiry on the poets W. H. Auden, Fernando Pessoa, Francis Ponge, Muriel Rukeyser, Paul Valery, and William Carlos Williams. She is also revising a translation of Julio Dinis's 1868 novel An English Family, about British wine merchants in Portugal.

Martin Christiansen
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 319
mart1023@yahoo.com

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MW 1-2pm

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 100 - Composition (2 Sections)

Martin Christiansen earned an M.A. from Central Michigan University in 1998.

View Martin Christiansen's CV

Dr. Gwen Crane
Professor
Netzer 313
607-436-2493
Gwen.Crane@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MW 1:00-2:00pm, 3-4

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 200 - Advanced Composition
ELIT 240 - Medieval English Literature
ELIT 270 - Shakespeare

Having completed her B.A. at UCLA and her Ph.D. at Princeton, Dr. Crane joined the Oneonta faculty in 1992. She directed the English Department’s Graduate Program from 1993-2001, and served as Department Chair from 1998 to 2005. She teaches courses in British Medieval and Renaissance Literature, early World Literatures, and Composition. Dr. Crane has received Mellon Foundation and NEH grants to support her studies in philology and medieval poetry. Dr. Crane was awarded the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2006, along with the SUNY Oneonta Outstanding Advisor and Mentor Award for that same year. She is interested in the history of rhetoric, textual iconography, and the literary representation of intellectual and spiritual authority. Before arriving at Oneonta, she worked as an editor for Macmillan, Scribner’s, and the UCLA School of Medicine.

Dr. Laura Dohner
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 319
607-436-2493
Laura.Dohner@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MW 11-12

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 100 - Composition (2 sections)

Laura Dohner earned a Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Binghamton, 2017.

View Laura Dohner's CV.

Dr. Amie Doughty
Professor, Department Chair
Netzer 322
607-436-2493
Amie.Doughty@oneonta.edu

Website

Amie A. Doughty

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MWF 10-11
T 12:30-1:30

Courses (Spring 2019):
LITR 243 - Major Author - Child and YA Literature

Dr. Doughty joined the faculty in Fall 2006 after spending several years teaching at Lake Superior State University in Michigan. She earned her MA from Indiana State University and her Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma. A generalist, she has taught classes in linguistics, composition, and literature, particularly children's literature, fantasy, and folk literature. She is the author of Folktales Retold: A Critical Overview of Stories Updated for Children (2006) and "Throw the book away": Reading versus Experience in Children's Fantasy (2013). Dr. Doughty's research interests are varied but lean toward the intersection of literature and linguistics, as well as language in popular culture.

Her research includes papers examining magic and technology in the Harry Potter, Artemis Fowl, and Faerie Wars series; language attitudes about the Junie B. Jones series; environmentalism in children's and YA fantasy; gender in urban fantasy by women; and storytelling, fate, and self-determination in Robin McKinley's folktale revisions. She is the Area Chair of the Children's and YA Literature and Culture area of the Popular Culture Association and the editor of the collection Children's and Young Adult Literature and Culture: A Mosaic of Criticism (2016).

Dr. Mark Ferrara
Associate Professor
Physical Science 139
607-436-2427
Mark.Ferrara@oneonta.edu

Mark S. Ferrara

Office Hours (Spring 2019):

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 150 - Intro to Creative Writing
LITR 100 - Themes in Literature
WLIT 281 - The Chinese Novel

Mark S. Ferrara,  Ph.D. University of Denver, 2004, is the author of several books, including Palace of Ashes (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015), Sacred Bliss (Roman and Littlefield, 2016), and New Seeds of Profit (Lexington Books, 2019). His new monograph, American Socialism, tells the oft-forgotten story of four centuries of communitarianism and intentional living and highlights a long legacy of homegrown socialism as community building that predates the egalitarian visions of the "utopian socialists," the publication of Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto (1848), and the founding of the Socialist Party of America in 1901.

Ferrara has taught for universities in the United States, South Korea, China, and on a Fulbright scholarship in Turkey. His courses are internationally focused, interdisciplinary, and aim to raise critical insight of other cultures through their literatures.

 

View Mark Ferrara's CV

 

Dr. Racheal Fest
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 314
607-436-2493
Racheal.Fest@oneonta.edu

Racheal Fest

Office Hours (Spring 2019)
MW 12-12:30 & 4-4:30

Courses (Spring 2019)                                               
COMP 100 - Composition (2 sections)

Racheal Fest completed her Ph.D. in English at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015. Her teaching and research focus on US literature, culture, and politics from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Broadly, her work considers the ways US traditions understand the nature and function of creative human activity. Recent projects do so by putting contemporary and modernist artists in conversation with neoliberal economists. General areas of interest include poetry and poetics, modernism, contemporary popular culture, new media, and the history of literary theory and criticism.

 

Dr. Fest’s essays and interviews (peer-reviewed and public) have appeared in boundary 2and b2o: an online journalPolitics/Letters, and elsewhere. Find her at www.rachealfest.com.
 

View Racheal Fest's CV

 

Dr. Kathryn Finin
Associate Professor
Fitzelle 358
607-436-3036
Kathryn.Finin@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019):


Courses (Spring 2019):
ELIT 371 - Shakespeare & Culture
LITR 222 - Science Fiction

Dr. Finin joined the English Department in 2003, after teaching Shakespeare and Literary/Critical Theory for several years as a part-time instructor at SUNY-Oneonta.In 2001, she received the college’s Simphiwe Hlatswayo Award for Excellence in Part-Time Teaching. Dr. Finin received her doctorate from Binghamton University in 1997, earning the Distinguished Research Award for her work on English Renaissance Drama. She has presented many scholarly papers at The Shakespeare Association of America, as well as other conferences, and published several essays on plays by Shakespeare, Webster, and Middleton.

Dr. Finin's teaching interests include courses on Shakespeare, Early Modern English literature, literary and critical theory, and various introductory survey courses. Currently, Dr. Finin is involved in two major research projects: one on Shakespeare’s female icons and a second on early modern English writers’ representations of Ireland and its people in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. She is developing courses on Spenser's The Faerie Queene and the notoriously fluid genre of Romance in English Literature. In addition to her teaching and scholarly interests, Dr. Finin is a trained labyrinth facilitator who offers various community labyrinth walks, lectures and workshops.

Dr. Roger Hecht
Associate Professor
Netzer 321
607-436-3033
Roger.Hecht@oneonta.edu

Roger Hecht

Office hours (Spring 2019):
W 9-11
Th 2:30-3:30

Courses (Spring 2019):
ALIT 207 - Environmental Literature
COMP 390 - Capstone in English
LITR 100 - Themes in Literature
 

Dr. Hecht joined the English Department as an Assistant Professor in 2006, after teaching literature and creative writing as a full-time lecturer at SUNY, Oneonta for several years. Dr. Hecht earned his MFA in Poetry from the University of Arizona (1990) and his Ph.D. from Syracuse University (2002). His dissertation addressed the intersection of politics and landscape representation in early American literature. He has published essays on James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, and Harriet Beecher Stowe.

His books include two edited anthologies: The Erie Canal Reader: 1790-1950 (Syracuse University Press, 2004)-literary writings about the Erie Canal-and Freemen Awake!: Rally Songs and Poems from New York's Anti-Rent Movement (Delaware County Historical Association (2017). His poetry has been published widely in literary journals and websites, such as Denver Quarterly, Prick of the Spindle, Sheila-Na-Gig on-line, and Yes Poetry. His first poetry collection is Talking Pictures (Cervena Barva Press, 2012). Dr. Hecht is currently researching a book on environmental themes in the animated films of Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata. He teaches courses in American literature, Literary/Critical Theory, and Creative Writing.

Dr. George Hovis
Professor
Fitzelle 362
607-436-2571
George.Hovis@oneonta.edu

“George Hovis publishes debut novel.” See article from “Carolina Weekly”

"Thomas Wolfe and the Lost Generation" lecture
at Boston Athenaeum

George Hovis

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
W 1-3, Th 2:30-3:30
 

Courses (Spring 2019):
ALIT 201 - American Literature 1865 - Present
COMP 270 - Fiction Workshop
LITR 150 - Introduction to Literary Studies

In addition to teaching courses in creative writing and American literature, George Hovis chairs the Red Dragon Reading Series, which features writers of national and international acclaim. He earned his Ph.D. in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has attended the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. His short fiction has been published in Carolina Quarterly, New Madrid, Limestone, The McNeese Review, Stone Canoe, and elsewhere.

His interviews and essays on literature of the American South have appeared in such journals as Southern Cultures, Mississippi Quarterly, The Southern Literary Journal, Appalachian Heritage, The North Carolina Literary Review, and The Thomas Wolfe Review. His book Vale of Humility (University of South Carolina Press, 2007) explores “plain folk” black and white in contemporary North Carolina fiction. Currently, he is at work on a novel about a North Carolina mill town adjusting to desegregation in the mid-1970s. In 2017, George received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching

Dr. Konstantina Karageorgos
Assistant Professor
Fitzelle 361
(607) 436-3473
Konstantina.Karageorgos@oneonta.edu

Konstantina Karageorgos

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MW  2:45-3:45

Courses: (Spring 2019):
COMP 290 - Writing About Literature
WLIT 270 - Postcolonial Literature & Culture: Africa

Konstantina M. Karageorgos received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Karageorgos's research interests include the post-45 African American novel, Africana avant-gardes, black internationalism, and aesthetics and narrative forms within the black radical tradition. Through a re-examination of philosophical theories of modernity/coloniality, her work analyzes literary forms of commitment that disrupt prevailing epistemological, aesthetic, and historical narratives on post-1945 black writing.

Her book in progress, Beyond the Blueprint: Decolonization, the Cold War, and the Making of an African American Avant-Garde, argues that African American radical writers living in the U.S., Europe, North and West Africa used the novel form to articulate new formal and political possibilities for black internationalism. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Mediations, South Atlantic Quarterly, and Against the Current, as well as the edited volume Lineages of the Literary Left. In addition to her scholarly monograph, she is at work on a crossover project that analyzes post-Ferguson reconstructions of mid-twentieth century African American literary and visual art in various media outlets including The New York Times, The Root, The New Republic, and The Atlantic.

LeeAnn Kuhn
Adjunct Professor
314 Netzer
Leeann.Kuhn@oneonta.edu

LeeAnn Kuhn

Office hours:

Courses: No courses
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

LeeAnn (Annie) Kuhn is a writer, editor, and artist. She has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts and has taught composition, creative writing, and literature courses at colleges in three states. Annie works as a freelance editor and ghostwriter through Red Bridge Editorial and is an active member of The Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators (SCBWI). She has also spent several years developing and running the CANO Writers Salon here in Oneonta. She has published non-fiction articles in Chicken Soup for the SoulPublisher's WeeklyCygnet, and regional newspapers, and her latest ghostwritten novel is a middle-grade mystery.


 

Dr. Richard Lee
Professor
Schumacher 111B
607-436-2520
Richard.Lee@oneonta.edu

Richard Lee

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
TTh 10-11, W 3:30-4:30
 

Courses (Spring 2019)
COMP 200 - Advanced Composition
LITR 250 - Approaches to Literature
WLIT 250 - European Literature & Culture

An alumnus of SUNY Oneonta for his B.A. in 1980 and M.A. in 1990, Professor Lee completed his doctoral work in Comparative Literature at Rutgers University in 2000. He has lectured and taught in China, South Africa, and throughout the United States, and was the first recipient of the Simphiwe Hlatswayo Teaching Award at Oneonta in 1998. He received the SUNY Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2004, and the SUNY Oneonta Outstanding Advisor Award in 2003. He teaches courses in world literatures and literary theory as well as composition. His recent publications include an introductory text for advanced high-school students, Globalization, Language, and Culture, articles on short fiction, theoretical issues, and cross-cultural concerns.

Dr. Joshua Lewis
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 314
607-436-3446
Joshua.Lewis@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
TuTh 12-12:50pm


Courses: (Spring 2019):
COMP 100 - Composition (2 sections)

Joshua Lewis has taught composition at various institutions, such as SUNY Broome Community College, Hartwick College, and SUNY Oneonta. He received his Ph.D. in English from Binghamton University, and he has been part of the Greater Binghamton Community for over 13 years. In his spare time, he writes poetry and fiction along with facilitating poetry workshops at the Broome County Arts Council, an organization dedicated to serving the arts.

Dr. Bambi Lobdell
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 314
607-436-3446
Bambi.Lobdell@oneonta.edu

Office Hours  (Spring 2019):
MW 3-3:50

Courses (Spring 2019):
LITR 283 - Women's Literature

Dr. Lobdell earned her Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Binghamton in 2007.

Dr. Eileen Morgan-Zayachek
Associate Professor
Associate Provost of Academic Programs
Netzer 332
607-436-2855
Eileen.Morgan@oneonta.edu

Eileen Morgan-Zayachek

A native of Long Island and graduate of Colgate University, Professor Morgan-Zayachek returned to New York in 2000 after spending the previous decade at Big 10 universities in the Midwest. She received a doctorate in English from Indiana University in 1998, specializing in Irish studies, and completed a two-year lectureship at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has received research grants and teaching commendations at both schools, and her publications include essays on the film Michael Collins and the novels of Irish author Edna O'Brien.

Her current research focuses on the influence of radio in Ireland, and her essay on Irish quiz programs during WWII appeared in the winter 2001 edition of History Ireland. She has also introduced and co-edited a collection of essays, A Century of Irish Drama: Widening the Stage (Indiana UP, 2001). She teaches courses in composition, critical theory, and Irish, British and American literature, and has a particular interest in William Butler Yeats.

Dr. Daniel Payne
Professor
Netzer 322
607-436-2493
Daniel.Payne@oneonta.edu

Website

Daniel Payne

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MWF 11-11:50, 2-3


Courses (Spring 2019):
ALIT 369 - Rachel Carson
COMP 150 - Introduction to Creative Writing
LITR 150 - Introduction to Literary Studies

Since Dr. Payne began teaching at SUNY Oneonta in the fall 2001 semester, he has created several new courses including creative writing workshops in screenwriting and creative nonfiction, and courses in American and environmental literature such as Hawthorne and Melville, Environmental Literature, Rachel Carson, and The River as Metaphor and Reality. Prior to teaching at SUNY Oneonta, Dr. Payne earned a J.D. at Albany Law School, and his experience as a practicing attorney included service as Counsel to the New York State Senate Transportation Committee. He then completed his M.A. and Ph.D. at the University at Buffalo, where his dissertation was a multidisciplinary study of American Nature Writing and Environmental Politics.

His book-length works include Voices in the Wilderness: American Nature Writing and Environmental Politics (1996); The Palgrave Environmental Reader (2005); Writing the Land: John Burroughs and His Legacy (2008); Why Read Thoreau’s Walden? (2013); and Orion on the Dunes: A Biography of Henry Beston (2016). Dr. Payne also directs the biannual John Burroughs Nature Writing Conference & Seminar, commonly referred to as the “Sharp Eyes” Conference, at SUNY Oneonta. In 2012, Dr. Payne was honored with the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Stephen Rice
Adjunct Professor
Milne Library 234
607-436-3156
Stephen.Rice@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
TBA

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP - Composition

Stephen  Rice earned an M.A. at SUNY Oneonta

Professor Angela Runciman
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 314
607-436-2493
Angela.Runciman@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019): 
M 2:30-3:45
W 2-2:45
 

Courses (Spring 2019)

COMP 100 - Composition (2 sections)

 

Angela E. Runciman is a PhD candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature at Binghamton University.  She holds an MA in English from Binghamton University, and a BA in English from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  In addition to teaching composition at SUNY Oneonta, Runciman has taught a variety of literature courses at Binghamton on topics such as Modern women writers and European Modernism, and an upper-level course on her research on Virginia Woolf, Walter Benjamin, and George Eliot.  From 2008-2014, she also taught developmental through research writing at Bloomsburg University and area community colleges.  Throughout her teaching career, she has participated on committees aimed at undergraduate- and graduate-student success and professional development.  She is a recipient of the Binghamton University Graduate Student Awards for Excellence in Teaching (2016-17), and Excellence in Service and Outreach (2013-14).

 

Her recent conference presentations include “‘For you should see the Milan gardens’: Recovering Lucrezia’s Immigrant Narrative in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway” at the International Conference of Europeanists in Chicago, IL in March 2018; “History Becomes Her: Bernini’s Ecstasy of St. Teresa as Emblem in Eliot’s Middlemarch” at the 2016 British Women Writers Conference at the University of Georgia; and “Unspeakable Trauma: Virginia Woolf, Ingeborg Bachmann, and the Language of War” at the 2015 International Conference on Virginia Woolf at Bloomsburg University.  In 2014, Runciman served as selected chair of the British Women Writers Association conference, organizing and hosting the 22nd annual meeting at Binghamton University.  She is a member of the Council for European Studies at Columbia University, British Women Writers Association Executive Board, International Virginia Woolf Society, and Modern Language Association.

 

 

Dr. Jonathan Sadow
Associate Professor
Fitzelle 173
607-436-2459
jonathan.sadow@oneonta.edu

Jonathan Sadow

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MWF 1-2pm

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 100 - Composition
ELIT 201 - English Literature - Renaissance to 18th Century
LITR 355 - Postmodernism
 

Jonathan Sadow is a specialist in eighteenth-century British literature who received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. He teaches classes in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literature that emphasize shifting conceptions of fiction, poetry, theater, gender, print culture, philosophy, and empire, as well as courses on literary theory, postmodernism, and irony. He has published articles and book chapters on genre, gender, puppets, and bagels. His recent chapter "Moral and Generic Corruption in Fenwick's Secresy" is part of the book collection Didactic Novels and British Women's Writing, 1790-1820, ed. Hilary Havens (Routledge 2017). He is affiliated with the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, and his current research interests primarily involve eighteenth-century women writers like Eliza Fenwick, Charlotte Smith, and Eliza Haywood.

Dr. Bianca Tredennick
Associate Professor
Fitzelle 360
607-436-2395
Bianca.Tredennick@oneonta.edu

Bianca Tredennick

Office Hours (Spring 2019):


Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 290 - Writing About Literature
ELIT 364  Dickens
LITR 100 - Themes in Literature

Dr. Tredennick is a specialist in nineteenth-century British literature, especially the novel. Her dissertation explores a materialist metaphorics of death prevalent in this era. She continues to like texts with corpses in them. Prior to coming to SUNY, Oneonta, Dr. Tredennick taught at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon, and at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington. In addition to creepy Victorian stuff, her interests include composition (no, really), the Seattle Mariners, and Grand Theft Auto. She is the author of the predictably morbid "'A Labor of Death and a Labor against Death': Scott's Cenotaphic Paratexts" (European Romantic Review) and "Some Collections of Mortality: Dickens, the Paris Morgue, and the Material Corpse" (Victorian Review), and she is the editor of the less cadaverous Victorian Transformations, 2011.

Andrew Tully
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 314
607-436-3116
AndrewTully@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
TTh 2:30-3:30


Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 100 - Composition (2 sections)

Andrew Tully earned an M.F.A. from Emerson College, 1994.

Emily Vogel 
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 314
607-436-3116
Emily.Vogel@oneonta.edu

Emily Vogel

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
MW 10-11am

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 100 - Composition
COMP 150 - Intro to Creative Writing (2 Sections)

Emily Vogel is an adjunct lecturer of creative writing. Her poetry has been published widely, most recently in Omniverse, The Paterson Literary Review, Lips, City Lit Rag, Luna Luna, Maggy, Lyre Lyre, The Comstock Review, The Broome Review, Tiferet, The San Pedro River Review, and 2 Bridges Review, among several others. She is the author of five chapbooks, and a full-length collection, The Philosopher's Wife, published in 2011 by Chester River Press, a collaborative book of poetry, West of Home, with her husband Joe Weil (Blast Press), and a recently released collection, First Words (NYQ Books). She has work forthcoming in The Boston Review and Omniverse. She teaches writing at SUNY Oneonta and Hartwick College, and lives with her husband, the poet Joe Weil, and their two children, Clare and Gabriel.

Al Winne
Adjunct Professor
Netzer 317
607-436-3442
al.winne@oneonta.edu

Office Hours (Spring 2019):
TTh 2-2:30, 5:15-5:45 HIRC 120AB
 

Courses (Spring 2019):
COMP 100 - Composition (2 Sections)

Al Winne earned a bachelor's degree from SUNY Oneonta in 1989.

Dr. Akira Yatsuhashi
Associate Professor
Fitzelle 359
607-436-3900
Akira.Yatsuhashi@oneonta.edu

Akira Yatsuhashi

Office Hours (Spring 2019):


Courses (Spring 2019):
On Sabbatical

Akira Yatsuhashi joined the English Department in 2011 after teaching Classics in the Upper Midwest. He earned his Ph.D. in Classical Studies from Duke University (2010) and also holds MAs in Classics (Tufts, 2003) and Comparative Literature and Japanese Poetics (Dartmouth, 2001).  He teaches courses in Greek and Roman literature, Greek and Latin language, and composition.  His research focuses on the uses of literature and scholarly writing in shaping and defining cultural and ethnic identity in colonial and imperial contexts.  He is currently researching the role the Library of Alexandria and its literary products played in allowing elites reimagine and reorder their cultural pasts in the wake of the conquests of Alexander of the Great.

Department Chair

Dr. Amie Doughty
Professor, Department Chair
Netzer 322
607-436-3035
amie.doughty@oneonta.edu

Secretary

Ruth Carr

Ruth.Carr@oneonta.edu
322 Netzer Administration Building
(607) 436-3446

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