Faculty & Staff

Faculty & Staff Dr. Chris Karmosky
Chris Karmosky, Assistant Professor of Meteorology and Climatology, explains drainage patterns at the continental divide.
Dr. Keith Brunstad

 

Dr. Keith A. Brunstad

Title: Associate Professor of Mineralogy and Geology
Office: 210 Janet R. Perna Science Building (607) 436-3066
E-mail: keith.brunstad@oneonta.edu

Classes taught:

GEOFYRST (GEOL 1000), Introduction to Geology (GEOL 1020), Mineralogy (GEOL 2042), Earth Materials (ESCI 3010), Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology (GEOL 3014), Structural Geology (GEOL 4030), Field Geology of Plate Boundaries (GEOL 4096)

Areas of interest:

Physical Volcanology, Volcano-tectonics, Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry

Research:

My primary area of research is in Physical Volcanology and Volcano-tectonics in which I’m interested in the generation, accumulation, transport, and eruption and emplacement processes associated with volcanic systems. Thus far, I have concentrated on the regional volcano-tectonic processes associated with plate-boundary environments such as the Cascade volcanic arc and intraplate environments associated with rifts like the Rio Grande of New Mexico and Hot Spots such as Hawaii. I employ a multidisciplinary approach by combining Sequence Stratigraphy, Geochemistry, Structure and Tectonics, and Geophysics to understand the genesis, evolution, and emplacement processes of both moderate and large volume volcanic systems. Volcanic rocks are analyzed by various analytical techniques including XRF, ICP-MS, SEM-EDX, EMPA, and Light Microscopy, most of which are available in the WSU Geoanalytical Lab and SUNY Oneonta. Currently, the main focus of my research is the generation, storage, and emplacement and eruption of the high-silica rhyolites associated with the most recent caldera forming eruption from Valles caldera, NM. In addition, I’m characterizing the subunit stratigraphy of the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff associated with this caldera-forming event. I’m also working with students on the emplacement of the Tieton andesite lava flow, which is currently the longest documented lave flow of this type, located in the Cascade Mountain Range of Washington State. Closer to home, I have students working on the environmental impact of reservoir sediment release in the Oneonta Creek drainage basin, Oneonta, New York as a case study, of the problem of aging dams and dam removal in the Northeast, USA. Finally, I also have students working on the geochemistry of the different anorthosites in the Adirondack Mountains of New York in conjunction with the New York State Museum.

Dr. Leigh Fall

Dr. Leigh M. Fall

Title: Associate Professor of Paleontology and Geology and Department Chair
Office: 213 Janet R. Perna Science Building (607) 436-2615
E-mail: leigh.fall@oneonta.edu

Classes taught:

Introduction to the Earth (ESCI 100), Introduction to Oceanography (ESCI 1010), Introduction to Geology (GEOL 1020), Earth History and the Fossil Record (GEOL 2020), Geology of the Rocky Mountain Region (GEOL 3708), Paleontology (GEOL 4021)

Areas of interest:

Paleontology, Paleoecology, Marine Invertebrates, Biodiversity, Body Size, Nitrogen Isotopes, Global Change, Paleoclimatology

Research:

My main research interest is examining biodiversity within the fossil record. The fossil record provides a way to investigate how organisms interacted with each other and their environment and how organisms respond to global change (e.g., migration or extinction) over 3.8 billion years of Earth’s history. Currently, my research focuses on investigating the trophic position (i.e., primary producer, herbivore, carnivore) of the moon snail Neverita duplicata. Neverita duplicata is a predatory snail that drills into the shells of their prey items (such as clams and snails) to consume the flesh. Neverita is found all along the east coast, including Long Island Sound. My research has shown that this moon snail is actually an omnivore, which has implications for the food web. The food web is an important concept for understanding changes in biodiversity. I investigated the trophic position of Neverita through nitrogen and carbon isotopes. Nitrogen and carbon isotopes are important tools for determining dietary sources and complex interactions. Although I am working with a modern organism, moon snails have a long fossil record and have been studied intensely as a model predator-prey system.

I recently began work on investigating biodiversity in the some of the rocks in New York, particularly during a major mountain building event known as the Taconic Orogeny in the Ordovician. A student and I are working on a project to assess how body size and abundances of trilobites change along a water depth gradient (shallow to deep) in the Middle Ordovician Trenton Group of Central New York. Both body size and abundances are ways to examine biodiversity in the fossil record.

Dr. Melissa Godek

 

Dr. Melissa Godek

Title: Associate Professor of Meteorology and Climatology
Office: 311A Science 1 Building (607) 436-3375
Email: Melissa.Godek@oneonta.edu

Classes taught:

Introduction to Climatology (METR 1011), Introduction to Meteorology (METR 1010), Climatology (METR 2012), Atmospheric Dynamics (METR 3050), Research Methods in Dynamics (METR 3051), Advanced Climatology (METR 3086), Mesoscale Meteorology (METR 4075)

Areas of interest:

Climate variability and change, Northeast US climate, winter climatology, dynamics, teleconnection patterns, (El Niño/ Southern Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation), air masses, atmospheric singularities, undergraduate research advancement, women in science, communicating scientific research through presentation

Research:

My primary research explores the intraseasonal climate variability that arises with the influence of teleconnection patterns. This allows me to learn about, for instance, how climate oscillation phases like El Niño impact the wide temperature swings that we may get day to day throughout the winter season (all while it may be “warmer than average”). I have also delved into the topic of atmospheric singularities and spent time scientifically validating the existence of events in folklore like the January Thaw and Indian Summer. Most of my time is actually spent with mentoring and co-authoring undergraduate student research. Projects that I have been involved with include examining the specific air masses associated with drought, developing a climatology of winter snow events in the Northeast, exploring how weather can impact MLB game delays and cancellations, and determining vertical atmospheric thickness variations during Albany snow and rain events. Currently two students and I are researching the possibility that hurricane track lengths and phase durations have changed with climate change.

Allison Hannigan

 

Allison Hannigan

Title: Lecturer in Meteorology
Office: 312 Janet R. Perna Science Building (607) 436-3322
E-mail:

Classes taught:

Introduction to Oceanography (ESCI 1010), Introduction to Meteorology (METR 1010), Weather Analysis and Forecasting I and II (METR 2060-3061)

Areas of interest:

Data analysis and visualization with python, the effects of a changing climate on extreme weather events, synoptic meteorology.

Research:

My current research utilizes the HYSPLIT model to study atmospheric moisture exchanges and concentrations along the trajectories of air parcels that precede heat wave events at major population centers in the Northeast US. More specifically, I am interested in understanding the dynamics of dry versus humid heat extremes.

Dr. Les Hasbargen

 

Dr. Les Hasbargen

Title: Associate Professor of Geomorphology and Geology
Office: 219 Janet R. Perna Science Building(607) 436-2741
E-mail: Leslie.Hasbargen@oneonta.edu

Classes taught:

Sustaining Water (GEOL 1002), Science of Natural Disasters (GEOL 1015), Introduction to Geology (GEOL 1020), Planetary Geology (GEOL 2050), Geological Data & Analysis (GEOL 2075), Introduction to Hydrogeology (GEOL 282), Geomorphology (GEOL 3070)

Areas of interest:

I am fascinated by Earth and planetary surface processes such as rivers, wind, glaciers, and waves, and the innumerable interactions in the critical zone which encompasses the atmosphere, plants, animals, soils, and groundwater.

Research:

My current research projects focus on 3D object reconstruction using structure-from-motion photogrammetry; shape evolution of alluvium in rivers; controls of turbidity in streams; and remote sensing of landforms and geologic features.

Les’ personal website

Dr. Chris Karmosky

 

Dr. Chris Karmosky

Title: Assistant Professor of Meteorology and Climatology
Office: 311B Science 1 Building (607) 436-2309
E-mail: Christopher.Karmosky@oneonta.edu

Classes taught:

Introduction to Oceanography (ESCI 1010), Introduction to Climatology (METR 1011), Introduction to Meteorology (METR 1010), Physical Meteorology (METR 2040), Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (METR 3080), Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere (METR 3085), Advanced Climatology (METR 3086)

Areas of interest:

Climatology, Polar Regions, Northeastern US Snowfall

Research:

Weather patterns affecting surface melt in Antarctica and Greenland, Using satellite remote sensing to detect and quantify surface melt of polar regions, Snowfall Climatology of the Eastern United States

Dr. Zo Kreager

Dr. Zo Kreager

Title: Assistant Professor of Geology
Office: 212 Janet R. Perna Science Building (607) 436-3065
E-mail: bailey.kreager@oneonta.edu

Classes taught:

Science of Natural Disasters (GEOL 1015), Introduction to Geology (GEOL 1020), Earth History and the Fossil Record (GEOL 2020), Investigations in Earth and Planetary Science (ESCI 2000 – for pre-service elementary teachers), Laboratory Techniques in Earth Science (ESCI 3015 – for pre-service secondary teachers),​​​​​​ Sedimentary Geology (GEOL 4060)

Areas of interest:

Spatial Visualization, Sequence Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, Classroom Pedagogies, Student Conceptual Understanding

Research:

My research focuses on three areas: student spatial visualization needs for complex geologic diagrams, best practices for classroom teaching, and student conceptual understanding. My spatial visualization research focuses on which spatial skills are important for students to complete sequence stratigraphic diagram interpretations and more broadly focus on how geologists use spatial skills for sedimentology and stratigraphy. My research on student conceptual understanding has focused on sedimentology and stratigraphy concepts.

My research on best practices for classroom teaching has recently focused on Predict-Observe-Explain Pedagogies. The activities created through this research have students complete inquiry activities in the classroom to build their knowledge about Earth phenomena collaboratively.

Dr. Scott Maguffin

Dr. Scott Maguffin

Title: Assistant Professor of Environmental Geology
Office: 214 Janet R. Perna Science Building (607) 436-3707
E-mail: scott.maguffin@oneonta.edu

Classes taught:

Introduction to the Earth (ESCI 1000), Sustaining Waters (GEOL 1002), Introduction to Hydrogeology (GEOL 2082)

Areas of interest:

Hydrogeology, Biogeochemistry, Microbiology

Research:

My research interests lie at the confluence of geology, chemistry, and microbiology. I am interested in the governing principles that dictate water chemistry, the movement of water and chemical species between hydrogeologic reservoirs, and the microbially driven chemical transformations between solid and aqueous phases. My research has focused on the biogeochemistry of groundwater species like iron, nitrate, sulfate, manganese, mercury, and arsenic in groundwater, soil, and agricultural systems. Overall, I am motivated by the need for a greater understanding of the biogeochemical and hydrologic processes governing agricultural and water resources.

Dr. Devin Castendyk

Dr. Devin Castendyk

Title: Adjunct Associate Professor
E-mail: devin.castendyk@hatch.com

Dr. Castendyk led the department's Water Resources program from 2005 to 2015 before becoming an environmental consultant in Denver, Colorado. He is now a Senior Geochemist and Project Manager at the global engineering firm Hatch, where he advises the mining industry on strategies to minimize the environmental impact of mining on water quality. Each summer, he continues to teach SUNY Oneonta's international course "Water and the Environment of Guatemala," with Dr. Tracy Allen in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability. He also provides advice to students seeking careers as environmental consultants. Students are invited to contact him with questions at devin.castendyk@hatch.com

Contact

Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
Janet R. Perna Science Building
(607) 436-3707

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