Psychology Faculty & Staff

Ursula Sanborn-Overby, Ph.D.

Ursula Sanborn-Overby, Ph.D.

Department Chair
161 Fitzelle Hall
607-436-3230
Ursula.Sanborn-Overby@oneonta.edu

Dr. Sanborn-Overby is a developmental psychologist. She researches the development of gender cognitions: how children learn about gender and how peoples’ ideas about gender change over time.

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Brenda Brooks

Administrative Assistant
161 Fitzelle Hall
607-436-3223
Brenda.Brooks@oneonta.edu

An avid Maker, Artist, Mother, and Helper. She's worked from the Comic book industry, to a church secretary and bulletin editor for a large company, from selling merch for a British pop stars US tours, to a press operator in a local aerospace machine shop. Most recently for SUNY Oneonta, she's worked the past 6+ years as; a cleaner, a Parking Office Lady, the Registrar's Office Assistant, the Administrative Assistant for The Academic Advisement Center, now a proud member of the Psychology Department. A current member and President of the Milford Rotary, Secretary for the Goodyear Lake Association and 1st VP for CSEA Local 635. She's a lifelong learner, world traveler, advocate, and friend.

Michael Brown, Ph.D.

Michael Brown, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
144 Fitzelle Hall
607-436-3558
Michael.Brown@oneonta.edu
Michael Brown's website

Michael Brown, Ph.D. (Associate Professor)
Dr. Brown is a social-cognitive psychologist. He studies decision-making and attitudes, particularly as they apply to issues involving gender, sexuality, and the law.

Charlene-Christie

Charlene Christie, Ph.D.

Professor
210B Schumacher Hall
607-436-3226
Charlene.Christie@oneonta.edu
Charlene Christie's website

Charlene Christie, Ph.D. (Professor)
Dr. Christie is a social psychologist. She researches stereotyping and prejudice, intergroup relations, social identity, and deviance.

Michael Faber, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

149 Fitzelle

607-436-3225

Michael.Faber@oneonta.edu

Dr. Faber is a social-personality psychologist whose research lies in how social and personality dynamics are expressed through media. His current interests include the study of Internet “trolling” personalities, the use of popular media in pedagogy, and parasocial interaction with admired media others.

Carey Fitzgerald, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

148 Fitzelle

607-436-3599

Carey.Fitzgerald@oneonta.edu

Dr. Fitzgerald is an evolutionary psychologist whose research focuses on the biological and social underpinnings of prosocial behaviors such as cooperation, generosity, and humor.

Richard Kauffman, Ph. D.

Assistant Professor
151 Fitzelle
Phone: 607-436-3246
E-mail: Richard.Kauffman@oneonta.edu

Dr. Kauffman is an evolutionary theorist. His work focuses on extending the explanatory scope of evolutionary theory to all aspects of humanity—biological, psychological, and cultural realms alike; emphasizing the utility of evolutionary theory as an applied science to inform evidence-based policy and practice at the individual, local, and global scales. His current research interests include the proximate and ultimate mechanisms of education (in both formal and informal contexts), science literacy, cognitive & behavioral development, prosocial behavior, psychological flexibility, group efficacy, and evolutionary mismatch (especially in relevance to physical & mental health, well-being, development, prosociality, and learning).

Robert Kirk

Robert Kirk, Ph.D., C.D.P.

Assistant Professor
145 Fitzelle Hall
607-436-3217
Robert.Kirk@oneonta.edu

Dr. Kirk is a developmental psychologist who specializes in adult development and aging. His interests include motivation, identity and self-consciousness, decision-making, emotional intelligence, stereotypes, online behavior, cannabis use, and successful aging.

Katherine S. Lau

Katherine S. L. Lau, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
172 Fitzelle Hall
607-436-3214
Katherine.Lau@oneonta.edu
Dr. Lau's website

Dr. Lau is an applied developmental psychopathologist. Her research focuses on the development of personality and aggression, as well as racial health disparities in at-risk and juvenile-justice-involved youth.