Teaching Innovation Institute

Jason Schmitt, Keynote Speaker

Academic Publishing: The Implications of Transitioning from Scarcity to Abundance

Jason Schmitt

 

Jason Schmitt is a filmmaker, journalist, and Chair of the Department of Communication, Media & Design at Clarkson University in Potsdam, NY.  Schmitt concentrates his research toward online education impacting a global audience, open access relating to academic publications, and the reproducibility crisis in science.

Schmitt’s documentary, “Paywall: The Business of Scholarship,” specifically investigates the economic and societal impact of academic publishing, the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier, and how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable technology companies like Apple, Facebook, and Google.

At a Glance Schedule

Time

Room

Event

12:00 to 12:20

Grille

Lunch 

12:30 to 1:30

Grille

Keynote

Jason Schmitt

1:40 to 2:40
Session 1

Craven

Keynote Follow Up

 

Room 104

Scholarship at the Threshold: Innovative Approaches to

Information Literacy

Sarah Rhodes (nee Karas), Reference & Instruction Librarian

Jean-Paul Orgeron, Senior Assistant Librarian

  Room 130       

Are you Reviewer 2? Communicating Criticism with Kindness & Compassion

Kristen Blinne, Associate Professor, Communication & Media

2:50 to 3:50
Session 2

Craven

An Open Access Policy Supporting Teaching, Learning, & Research

Darren Chase, Director, Library

Open Access Committee

Room 104

Crafting an Effective Sabbatical

Brian Lowe, Professor, Sociology

Beth Small, Chair, Foreign Languages & Literature

     

4:00 to 5:00

Le Cafe

Cocktails

 

Past Institutes

Because it Matters: Engaging Students in Today's Colleges and Universities

Ernest Morrell, Keynote Speaker

Ernest Morrell

Ernest Morrell is the Coyle Professor in Literacy Education an inaugural director of the Center for Literacy Education in the University of Notre Dame's Institute for Educational Initiatives. Morrell is serving a three-year term on the American Educational Research Association's Executive Committee (AERA). Prior to this position, Morrell was the Macy Professor of English Education at Columbia University's Teachers College and was the director of Columbia's Institute for Urban and Minority Education (IUME). In addition to this work, he has been president of the National Council of Teachers of English and a member of the International Literacy Association and the ILA's Literacy Research Panel.

At a Glance Schedule

Time

Room

Event

11:40 to 12:30

Waterfront

Lunch 

12:40 to 1:40

Waterfront

Keynote

Ernest Morrell

1:50 to 2:50
Session 1

Glimmerglass

Keynote Follow Up

 

Susquehanna

Open Education Resources (OER) in SUNY

Mark McBride, SUNY System

  Union Square         

Anxiety, Depression, and More: The Surge of Mental Health Symptoms among College Students

James Zians, Associate Professor, Psychology 

Rebecca Harrington, Health Educator, Health Center

3:00 to 4:00
Session 2

Susquehanna

Using Video to Move the Lectures out of the Classroom

Chilton Reynolds, Adjunct Lecturer/HCI Designer/Programmer, Teaching, Learning, & Technology Center

Union Square

What You're Really Saying: How Voice Production Communicates in the Classroom and the Workplace

Andrew Kahl, Associate Professor, Theatre

 

4:00 to 5:00

Le Cafe

Cocktails

Teaching, Leading, and Learning through Compassion

Christopher Kukk, Keynote Speaker

Headshot of C. Kukk

This talk combines research findings in the fields of neuroscience and social sciences to demonstrate how and why compassion is a key source of success in achieving several interconnected goals in education (i.e., more effective teaching and learning as well as more productive teams/departments).

Christopher Kukk is the author of the text The Compassionate Achiever and Professor of Political Science/Social Science at Western Connecticut State University and the founding Director of the Center for Compassion, Creativity and Innovation.

At a Glance Schedule

Time

Room

Event

11:40 to 12:30

Grille

Lunch featuring a performance from Pitched Slapped

 

12:40 to 1:40

Grille

Keynote

Christopher Kukk

1:50 to 2:50
Session 1

105

Keynote Follow Up

 

104

Simple Mindful Practices for the Classroom: Increasing Students' Capacity to Engage, Reflect, and Learn

Kim Griswold, Liz Huntington, and Jeannine Webster, Instructors, Student Learning Center

Teaching is an art that depends on effective communication with our students, but it is in the spaces between our words that students truly learn. Incorporating mindful practices into our classrooms can enhance our students' capacities to engage with new ideas, reflect, and learn on a more meaningful level. This workshop will explore simple, contemplative techniques to encourage deeper learning experiences both in and out of the classroom.

  Craven             

Navigating the Maze: Labyrinth Walks & Academic Life

Kathryn Finin, Associate Professor, Department of English 

From ancient times to present, humans have experienced the benefits of mindful/contemplative walking. Labyrinth walks reduce stress, quiet the mind, and ground the body. While labyrinths look like mazes, they are actually a single, winding path with no dead ends or wrong turns. The session will start with a very brief introduction to labyrinths and labyrinth walking. Primarily, however, this is an opportunity for participants to experience the ancient practice of labyrinth walking on a temporary labyrinth in Craven Lounge. Following the walk, there will be some private time to reflect on your experience. Toward the end of the session, we will discuss some strategies for benefits of integrating this kind of practice into the college classroom. 

3:00 to 4:00
Session 2

104

Privileging Our Bodies: Enfleshing Our Pedagogies in the Classroom

Dr. Greg Hummel, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication and Media

In this break out session, we will reflect on and examine the ways that we communicate with our bodies in the classroom. Attending to our bodies beyond Cartesian dualism, this session focuses on dialoguing with ourselves and each other about the importance of recognizing and interacting with bodies in the classroom. In doing so, our goal is to understand both our bodies and our students’ bodies differently while working to incorporate our bodies into our already-existing pedagogical strategies.

130

Introduction to Contemplative Pedagogy

Kristen C. Blinne, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication and Media

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the philosophy and practice of contemplative pedagogies or teaching and learning methods designed to cultivate presence - via heightened awareness, deep concentration, self-reflection, and the cultivation of greater empathy and compassion for oneself and others. Within this session, a variety of methods will be explored and several contemplative pedagogy practices will be facilitated, encouraging participants to understand how students might experience contemplative pedagogy. Additionally, a resource guide will be provided for further reference.

 

4:00 to 5:00

Le Cafe

Cocktails

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