Life of the Mind

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Virtual Faculty Showcase

Spotlighting the teaching, research and scholarship, creative activity, service, and varied integrated contributions made by our faculty to the intellectual life of the campus community and beyond.

If you would like to be included in the 2021 virtual LOTM, please complete the LOTM presentation survey found here by Monday, November 1. You will be asked to submit an abstract for your presentation and to choose one or more times on November 16 and 17 that you will be available online during the event.

The platform we will be using, Acadiate, presents PDF posters for each project, but also provides options to embed other material and media (e.g., audio and video introductions, YouTube or other links, publications, abstracts, documents, PowerPoint files, Sway presentations), accommodating participation from across the disciplines including scholarly projects and performing and visual arts. (See the 2021 Student Research and Creative Activity Day [SRCA] Acadiate site that is still available for reference.)

“Live-virtual” sessions will be hosted on the Acadiate platform (through Teams links) on Tuesday, November 16 and Wednesday, November 17 from 10-11, 11-noon, 2-3 and 3-4 (on both days). Through the submission survey, participants will have the option to choose one or more hour-long blocks of time to be available online in Teams to present their project and answer questions.

All uploaded presentations will be available to view beginning November 16 and will remain available for viewing for a full year. Links will be provided for visitors to attend the live, online poster sessions on November 16 and 17. More information and instructions will be provided to presenters including a video training on how to upload presentation materials.

Contact kathy.meeker@oneonta.edu or christine.barberio@oneonta.edu if you have questions.

Click HERE to learn how to post your LOTM presentation on the Acadiate platform.


2020 Life of the Mind Presentations - Archived

Link to Presentation

Abstract: Countries from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East are now visible at the Venice Biennale—the so-called Olympics of contemporary art.  The Philippines’ first official participation at the Venice Biennale’s 32nd International Art Exhibition in 1964 was a moment of pride and predicament. Amid the ill-developed culture in art history and artistic practice and the lack of government financial support, corruption occurred through the closed process adopted by the artist selection committee and the reciprocity of personal favors dispensed by the implementing body, the Art Association of the Philippines. The official return of the Philippines after a 51-year hiatus in 2015, hence, warranted a democratic, collaborative, and international process. This sign of progress, particularly because of an unprecedented government funding, however, became the very opportunity to profit from a systemic culture of corruption. Funded by the SUNY Oneonta Faculty/Professional Staff Research and Creativity Grant 2019-2020, a 10-day-long archival research of primary sources on the Philippines’ participation at the Venice Biennale at the Historical Archives of Contemporary Arts and first-hand observation and documentation of the Philippine Pavilion at its 58th International Art Exhibition were conducted in Venice, Italy in May-June 2019. This poster reports on this progress.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: In October 1991 at the University of Arizona fall reading series, Gloria Anzaldúa read several poems and short stories–work now held at the UT-Austin Latin American Studies Collection. As part of her praxis, Anzaldúa makes space for queer people, both through her words and vocal tone. Listening to her reading, you can hear her nervous, silly laugh–echoed in the laughs of her audience–reach out to bring me into that space, that time. Her smooth, slow and raspy voice–her vocalic body–touches me as I listen. In their introduction to The Affect Reader, Gregory J. Seigworth and Melissa Gregg assert affect’s “immanent capacity for extending […] both into and out of the interstices of the inorganic and non-living, intracellular divulgences of sinew, tissue and gut economies and the vaporous evanescenses of the incorporeal (events, atmospheres, feeling-tones)” (2).This sound recording of Anzaldúa’s poetry reading is an example of the immanent capacity this “incorporeal” event has to resonate and “sometimes stick to bodies and worlds” for listening audiences (1). Affect in its simplest form is “the name we give to those forces […] that serve to drive us to movement, towards thought and extension” and is “synonymous with force or forces of encounter (2).” My encounter with Anzaldúa’s (incorporeal) recording and the affect created through listening to her work lead me to ponder an answer to Seigworth and Gregg’s question: How does a body marked in its duration by these various encounters with mixed forces, come to shift its affections (its being affected) into action (capacity to affect)? (2) Toward an answer to this question, this essay explores my relationship between Anzaldúa’s voice and my pedagogy, both her speaking voice as well as the interior voice she offers her audience, the way in which she opens spaces for queer women of color, and the resonances I find in both.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: Technology is increasingly being used in the workplace. While some may say that it helps businesses to be efficient, others argue that there is an intrusion on the privacy of employees. In the past, techniques have included access to employee emails, social media and internet browsing in addition to searches of employee offices and the use of surveillance cameras. However, powerful monitoring technology presents the most threatening challenge to privacy. Currently little protection appears to be available for employees under the law. The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution establishes some limitations on the monitoring of government workers. However, this right to privacy does not appear to apply to the private sector. State statutes are not always specific in protecting employees. This research contributes to the literature by highlighting the issues related to the workplace right to privacy. It proposes that a reasonable expectation of privacy for employees be balanced by the need for businesses to provide efficient and safe working conditions.

Student contributors: Ashley Germosen Rosa, Asana Ibrahim, Brittney Cordice-Little, Claire Curtin, Chloe Tarlin, Eduardo Lopez, Eva Zepeda, Helen Sanchez, Joseph Liszovics, Liam Buchanan, Luke Boylan-Hockett, Madalyn Hammes, Shayla Szeto, Sean Walis

Link to 2-minute Video

Link to 20-minute Presentation

Link to Project Wiki

Abstract: This year, SUNY Oneonta students are representing our college at the world’s premier Synthetic Biology competition, the iGEM Giant Jamboree. At the Giant Jamboree, teams of high school, undergraduate, and overgraduate students compete for medals by presenting projects in which they designed, fabricated and tested of biological organisms, and the results of investigations into the societal, ethical and economic impacts of their ideas. Our team of 14 students, representing six different majors, were inspired to use synthetic biology to help small dairy farms. Their idea, to help farmers enter a niche dairy market, the production of A2 milk. This type of milk is produced by cows with a variant form of an abundant milk protein, which is common in other parts of the world, but not so in the United States. The team choose to focus their project Ca2LF (Confirming A2 Alleles using Luminescence in the Field) around development of a field-deployable genetic testing system to perform A-status genotyping on cattle. Team members have worked on the science and the human practices of the project over the summer and are now working on creating competition materials. The team must create a 2-minute project promotion video, a project wiki, a 20-minute oral presentation video, and a poster, along with various safety and judging forms prior to the start of the Giant Jamboree on November 14th. In this submission to the virtual showcase, we are sharing these works.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: An important but little understood problem facing humanity is urban dependency. This phenomenon refers to the reality of the growing majority of the human population living in urban areas, with fewer performing the important and essential work of rural laborers. We all live in an energy economy that cannot be ignored. We examine this issue from a global and cross-national perspective, with emphasis on the issues of food and energy dependence, highlighting urban-rural disparities. This presentation considers the nature of urban dependency, while offering recommendations rooted in sustainability.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: A seiche is a regular oscillation of water in an enclosed body of water such as a lake or bay. It is effectively a standing wave that forms on the surface of the basin. The period if oscillation depends on the geometric characteristics of the basin and the acceleration of gravity. This project looks at a shallow water standing wave generated in a small circular above-ground pool. Using an ultrasonic range sensor, we observed the surface height of the pool at 0.2 second intervals for approximately 600 seconds. The data are fit to a function representative of a damped harmonic oscillator to determine the initial amplitude, period and decay time constant of the wave. The initial amplitude, period and decay time constant are found to be 6.2 cm, 1.975 s and 340 s, respectively. Since the decay time constant is much larger than the period, frictional effects have a negligible impact on the period of the seiche. Theoretically, the surface height should satisfy the two-dimensional wave equation. We apply a finite difference scheme to solve the cylindrical wave equation for the surface height. We find that the theoretical period agrees with the observations if a wave speed consistent with the pool dimensions is used instead of the wave speed provided by the shallow wave approximation. We will discuss the characterization and modelling of the seiche.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: With the shift to remote learning at the start of the Fall 2020 semester, the Theatre Department embarked on two fully remote shows. The first was Medea, a Greek tragedy directed by Kiara Pipino that was intended to be recorded in-person on the Goodrich Theater stage. The second was My Father’s Dragon, a children’s story adapted and directed by John McCaslin-Doyle to be done remotely. To enable these remote shows, the Theatre Department developed a computer system which could capture the actor performances from their homes, edit them together, and broadcast them to an audience. Two shows … eighteen actors … 2-1/2 months … and only one computer system. Created to help others develop their own remote performance systems, this deep-dive presentation is organized by project phases: Goals, Research, Implementation, Testing, Utilization, Performance, and Reflections. A four-part video version of the presentation is available on the Theatre Department Facebook page. There is also an abridged video version that is more suitable to those less versed in theatre, or that are not developing their own remote systems for theatrical performance.
Link to Abstract with photos

Link to Presentation

Abstract: Inequality within the classroom can happen by design. The particular case of British education, where teachers are taught how to streamline and set targets based on statistics, might be considered as generating inequalities by design. As British schools spread throughout the world, inequalities by design within the classroom appears in countries where such practices are unheard of. This presentation aims to explain current British school practices that lead to inequalities within the classroom.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: My novel The Skin Artist (SFK, 2019) explores, among other subjects, the explosive growth of the Sunbelt South at the turn of the twenty-first century and the question of whether economic development has led to freedom that is real or only illusory. A pivotal scene in the novel is based on the demolition of the historic Independence Building in uptown Charlotte, North Carolina, followed by the erection of a newer, larger, 101 Independence Center. The novel’s two primary characters mirror the rapid changes to the landscape by covering themselves in tattoos, including one full-back portrait of Adam and Eve on the brink of fateful discovery. In a three-minute film clip, I meditate on my research into Charlotte’s history, especially the legacy of its apocryphal “Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence,” published in 1819, but purported to have been signed on May 20, 1775, which would have made the document, if it actually existed, the first declaration of independence from Great Britain drafted and signed in the colonies.

Link to Lecture

Link to Performance

Abstract: Chopin in Mallorca is a two-part video documentary underwritten by a Faculty Research and Creative Activity Grant and realized in collaboration with SUNY Oneonta students Kelsey Negron and Raju Eastland from the Media and Communications Department and Zanida Banks-Rollins from the Audio Arts program. In the first video, Dr. Adam Kent discusses Chopin’s Twenty-Four Preludes, Op, 28, written while Chopin and his lover George Sand were wintering on the island of Mallorca in 1838-39. This collection of short, introductory works in each of the 24 major and minor keys, is an oblique homage to the Well-Tempered Clavier of J. S. Bach.  The presentation explores the relationship between Chopin and Sand, analyzes the composer’s unique polyphonic approach and daring harmonic language, and raises questions about unity among the fleeting miniatures gathered in this collection. The second video is a complete performance of the work, recorded in Studio A of the Fine Arts Center.

Link to Lecture

Link to Performance

Abstract: Mozart in Vienna is a two-part video documentary underwritten by a Faculty Development Grant and created in collaboration with SUNY Oneonta students Kelsey Negron from the Media and Communications Department and Zanida Banks-Rollins from the Audio Arts program. In the first video, Dr. Adam Kent discusses Mozart’s Fantasy and Sonata in C Minor, K. 475/457, one of the composer’s most forward-looking compositions, providing biographical background, formal analysis, questions about historical sources, and conjectures about the relationship between spontaneity and design in creativity. The second video is a complete performance of the work, recorded in Studio A of the Fine Arts Center.

Link to Presentation 
Note: Link is to Session 8 of the 2020 Bahamas Natural History Conference; the "Rapid Assessment of Crab Replenishment ..." presentation starts at 19:40 and ends at 44:50

Link to Presentation

Abstract: Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) are a concern since interstates and river systems run through the Catskills. Watershed stewards protect lakes or rivers from harm, particularly Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS).  Maine and Minnesota pioneered citizen interactions to thwart AIS. In 2011, NY State had watershed steward programs (WSPs) protecting the Adirondacks, Lake George, Lake Champlain, and the Ausable River.  As documented by Paul Smith’s College, WSPs slow AIS spread. The Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP) and the BFS noted local interest in WSPs and initiated a pilot program in 2012. In 2020, we hired 24 students as stewards using NYSDEC AIS contract funding, participated in State-wide train the trainer training and, then, trained three classes of stewards for our students and for the Town of Springfield (Otsego Lake), the Canadarago Lake Improvement Association (CLIA), Sullivan County Lakes and the National Park Service (Delaware River). Classes focused on local invasive threats and provided lectures, organism familiarity (by handling), boat and equipment inspection techniques, vessel and trailer cleaning, and interpretive messaging. COVID precautions created challenges that were overcome. Following classes, stewards inspected and advised waterbody users at waters’ edges using social distancing. We followed up with visits to the stewards at their stations. Visits reinforced correct techniques, expanded exotics knowledge, and corrected incorrect techniques. Additionally, we refined our steward field manual which is maintained at WSP stations and assisted in the development of State-wide steward guidance and a refined tablet and cell phone-based data entry program. Power washers were used at both Canadarago Lake and Otsego Lake. Stewards collected data regarding water body access and waterbody user AIS prevention practices using social distancing. No steward was infected with COVID. We recommend expanded WSP training to include other citizen groups, municipalities, lake, stream and river stakeholders, and government entities. Each new program reinforces neighboring program effectiveness, and the cost to train each steward can be reduced with economies of scale. Stewards are motivated to excellence more by waterbody concerns than by a focus on remuneration and their enthusiasm is reinforced by supervisory attention and access to expertise.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: Otsego Lake has been infested with invasive Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) since before 2008. This year we identified Quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) in Otsego Lake from an Ekman dredge sample, from a Lake trout’s stomach, and from samples obtained from the Village of Cooperstown’s water intake. Sample enumeration shows young-of-the-year dreissenied mussels are mostly Quagga mussels. Other lakes in Upstate NY have had infestations of Quagga mussels before us. From their experience, we know that we are in for changes in Otsego Lake. Much like Zebra mussels, Quagga mussels will attach themselves to most surfaces in shallow water. Unlike Zebra mussels, Quagga mussels will thrive in the deep cold waters of Otsego Lake. Because of the shape of Otsego Lake's basin, Quagga mussels have considerably more lake bottom to use than do the Zebra mussels. The expanded community of invasive mussels will continue to filter more of plankton out of Otsego Lake's water clearing the water and moving lake life activities to the lake bottom. Increased and selective filtering may increase the potential for Otsego Lake Hazardous Algae Blooms (HABs) and impact fisheries. Light is now reaching more of Otsego Lake’s bottom with the result that our rooted aquatic plants and macroalgaes are growing in Otsego Lake waters deeper than has been seen by the BFS previously. The BFS will continue to monitor Otsego Lake’s changes.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: COIL is a structured virtual ex-change program from the State University of New York that supports faculty in NY and abroad who seek to connect with their students remotely. COIL falls under SUNY’s Applied Learning (APL) definition and criteria, which states that students learn by engaging in direct application of skills, theories, and models. The SUNY-COIL module is based on an intentional and structured collaboration; it provides faculty and students opportunities to think critically about cross-cultures and to solve problems in an authentic communicative interaction, all while completing a collaborative project. Hence, the SUNY-COIL module prepares students with employability skills for global careers through structured reflection on, and acknowledgment of interculturalism. Our Oneonta campus has been engaged and growing with some COIL faculty partnerships. However, there is a need for in-campus structured collaboration to sustain COIL practices. This collaboration aims to internationalize the curriculum and work across disciplines to facilitate the implementation of intercultural/interlinguistic education. I am an alumna of the Fulbright Scholars program, and I signed my commitment with the U.S. government to continue my efforts to improve U.S. relations with the rest of the world. Therefore, my goal is to develop a model that incorporates international academic relationships seeking to educate our students to become competent intercultural future leaders. I envision a leadership team to perform various tasks in collaboration with the Office of Global Education, the Teaching Learning and Technology Center, and the Foreign Languages and Literatures department, this last one to bridge among disciplines, cross-cultures and languages. This collaboration seeks to disseminate COIL across the disciplines and strengthen SUNY-Oneonta relationships abroad while supporting professional development and global research for faculty. The goal is to allow our faculty to connect and develop interdisciplinary curricula, institute a Fulbright Scholar exchange program on campus, and to enhance international experiences in our classrooms across disciplines.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: This series of prints responds to the Mark Twain quote: Geologic time is not money. I built the layers on the prints slowly using both relief and photo intaglio printmaking techniques. I was working with a cast of plates both new, created for this series, and returning from earlier debuts. I was thinking about the layers of the earths’ crust. How that crust is an evolving document of processes. How this is similar to our human memories, both individual and collective, but on a much, much larger scale. I was thinking how things are devalued when equated with money. I was thinking that “geo” has its own logic. We need to listen at that scale.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: Long before the Covid-19 pandemic disrupted lives, countries, and the global business and legal communities, the challenges to building bridges and communicating with clients and attorneys from other countries had already presented a host of cultural, technological and logistical challenges to contract negotiation and drafting. Many of my students have never travelled abroad and have had limited opportunity to work with students from other countries. Recognizing the need for them to develop a broader cultural understanding and global perspective and the skills necessary to work in a global legal and business context, I created a collaborative online learning project with a colleague from the JAMK School of Applied Sciences in Jyväskylä, Finland which we completed with our students this past spring semester. Utilizing pre and post project surveys and students’ reflective papers, the pedagogical paper assesses the collaborative online international learning project and provides a roadmap for other educators to develop similar programs.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: This presentation reports a new research paradigm for studying young (3-5 year olds’) children’s cognitive and affective understanding of actual transgressions, moral and prudential domains, in the family as actually reported by the parent, but in a way that provides the child with an opportunity to reflect on and reason about the actual events. A total of 38 parent-child dyads participated. Child reasoning was coded for its relevance to the nature of the transgression, harm to others (moral) and harm to self (prudential). Findings illuminate different levels of moral thinking developed during preschool years, specifically (a) there was a sharp break between the understanding of 3 and 4-5 year olds in both domains; however, (b) the rate of increased relevance of the reasoning to the act seems to have been greater for prudential than moral transgressions, and (c) the relevance of their explanation of their feelings to the nature of the transgressors (as agent) seems to develop more slowly in the moral than the prudential domains. Somewhat puzzling and unexpected was the failure of the 3 year olds to understand the dangers inherent in prudential transgressions. Overall, the research suggests that young children’s knowing (what is “right” or “wrong”) and true understanding or owning moral knowledge (understanding relevance to self) may be different, and full development of owning knowledge may only develop after preschool years.

Link to Presentation

Abstract: Literacy in science and other content areas is important, but not limited to informational and argumentative reading and writing and for personal learning. As newer, collaborative, creative, and technology-enhanced inquiry spaces are intensely researched in a larger education field, there is a need to re-conceptualize and reconfigure literacy in the age of collective creativity and technology. Such reconceptualization can contribute to better understanding of literacies that enable knowledge building in creative, inquiry-based learning spaces. This research is conducted as a part of larger research initiative aimed to create social and technological supports for sustained knowledge building across classrooms and school years. We engaged in the analysis of student interviews, videos, notes, and student written syntheses of research in order to examine our research question: What is the nature of students’ dialogic transliteracy in cross-community scientific inquiries? The creation of the themes was informed by the conception of dialogic literacy (Wegerif, 2013), transliteracy (Thomas et al., 2007), and communities of practice (Wenger, 1998) and as our conceptual framework, while remaining open to possible new aspects of new literacies. Findings reveal sophisticated levels of dialogic transliteracy: Problem solving dialogue to advance to advance coherence in knowledge building; Reflective synthesis to develop “big ideas” in the context of others’ work; and Making knowledge accessible to peers in their community and beyond. By providing the description of an example of literate practices in scientific knowledge building, this study informs the implementation of new learning standards

Link to Presentation

Abstract: The overarching goal of our NSF-sponsored program was to reduce the financial burden of an undergraduate education in a STEM field for those with a financial need and to improve their academic experience through mentorship, team building, and research and professional travel opportunities. Each student had the opportunity to earn up to $21,600 in scholarships, were mentored individually by program investigators, and had the chance to participate in cohort-based science and philosophy courses while also receiving fiscal support for research, professional meeting travel and study-abroad travel. The average 4-year graduation rate is 100% for S-STEM Critical MaSS students who completed the whole program, whereas it is only about 66% for their institutional STEM-major peers. Program completers had a final overall grade point average of 3.40, compared to 3.25 for their institutional peers. We were successful in recruiting students with greater financial need than their STEM-major peers, as S-STEM Critical MaSS students had a greater average Pell grant than those peers. Students in the program also graduated with less subsidized, parent, and unsubsidized student loan debt than their institutional STEM-major peers. Post-program surveys of students showed that 86% of respondents felt that the program increased their interest in STEM, 100% thought that the faculty mentoring provided contributed to their success as undergraduate STEM majors, and the same 100% thought that the program components overall helped them complete their undergraduate degree.

 

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